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Dairy Facts 2016

IDFA Supports Five Additives Under USDA Review

Apr 20, 2016

IDFA submitted comments last week to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Standards Board to recommend the continued use of five additives in processed organic dairy products. IDFA strongly supported the renewal of agar-agar, carrageenan, cellulose, glucono delta-lactone and Silicon dioxide in this year’s review.

Every five years, the board must decide whether to continue to allow the use of these ingredients under a "sunset provision" that mandates the review process. The board considers several criteria, including the impact of the substance’s use on human health, the processors’ need for the substance and its compatibility with organic production and handling.

IDFA specifically called out carrageenan and cellulose as safe and necessary ingredients used in making dairy products. Carrageenan, for example, interacts well with milk proteins and helps companies to adjust texture and mouthfeel in a broad range of dairy products, especially when companies want to reformulate to low-fat versions. Cellulose, IDFA said, has been used safely and effectively as an anticaking agent for years and should also remain on the list.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved carrageenan and cellulose as safe food additives, IDFA said.

For more information, contact Emily Lyons, IDFA director of regulatory affairs and counsel, at

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